Street Sartorialist photography

Though the last few postings might give that impression, this blog is not converting itself into another Sartorialist ersatz. Don't worry, it is not. Yet...
Though the last few postings might give that impression, this blog is not converting itself into another Sartorialist ersatz. Don't worry, it is not. Yet Paris is also about fashion and glamour, and therefore represent a theme I like to include in my pictures. As you might know, the Sartorialist hunt the streets, in search of fashion. Candidness and composition are often secondary to his approach, it is above all about what the person wear, not what she/he expresses or how she/he interacts with others. This is quite the opposite in street photography as these elements are key. This led...

Memories of a bar

It's 10am on a Thursday morning. The usually busy streets of Montmartre are still deserted. Inside a bar, a man leans against a table. He...
It's 10am on a Thursday morning. The usually busy streets of Montmartre are still deserted. Inside a bar, a man leans against a table. He probably does not feel like talking, at least not to the barman. Or he is just waiting for his friends to arrive, one by one. A daily ritual. I love bars in Paris, they are impregnated with decades, sometimes centuries of customers' stories. Tales of far away adventures, bold conspiracies, political discussions, or love pledges seem to linger in the air, without ever to be caught. There is a maybe bit of all of that...

Back to Chanel times

Paris is a unique city, you walk past a corner of a street and suddenly you feel thrown back in time. The times of Coco...
Paris is a unique city, you walk past a corner of a street and suddenly you feel thrown back in time. The times of Coco Chanel ? (click on picture for high res) Leica M9 with 50mm Summicron at F2.0, 1/350, ISO160

To blur or not to blur

Often wrongly considered as a gimmick in street photography, the capability to blur backgrounds (or foregrounds) is to the contrary a wonderful creative tool when...
Often wrongly considered as a gimmick in street photography, the capability to blur backgrounds (or foregrounds) is to the contrary a wonderful creative tool when used appropriately. To illustrate it, let's have a look at two similar pictures taken in Paris by Notre Dame. In both cases, the focus was set on the little girl being portrayed by the painter. An aperture of F4.0 was used in the first frame while the second was taken with an aperture of F1.4 (on the 60mm Konica Hexanon F1.2).  What are the key differences generated by these two different exposure settings ? In...

Love letters

Maybe they should implement special mailboxes for love letters. 100% certified that it will reach destination. I often take my Sigma DP2 along the M9,...
Maybe they should implement special mailboxes for love letters. 100% certified that it will reach destination. I often take my Sigma DP2 along the M9, especially for unprocessed color work. It is where I feel it especially shines. These pictures are out of camera JPG, in vivid mode. You'll also notice the influence of my future job in this pictures ... the shoe business ! (click on pictures for high res) Sigma DP2 at 41mm, ISO100

The lost street photographers

Yesterday we went for a walk in the Paris flea market. As usual when going there, I paid a visit to the block where all...
Yesterday we went for a walk in the Paris flea market. As usual when going there, I paid a visit to the block where all the photography stores are located. What a great place too buy vintage cameras, books, and prints. A bit oddly, these shops also sell prints of unknown photographers, mainly family portraits and landscapes. These pictures probably ended up there when their last owners died and nobody took over them. I could not avoid to put my hands in this box of memories and look for street photographs. About half an hour later, I left the shop...

Kiss over the Seine River

I guess that this is what Paris is about for many people. 18 years old, maybe the first trip away from home and a passionate...
I guess that this is what Paris is about for many people. 18 years old, maybe the first trip away from home and a passionate kiss over the Seine River.  Obviously, I would never have taken this picture if the couple was over 40 years old. The odds of it being an extra marital affair would simply be too high. Let's stick to the innocence years. (click on picture for high res) Leica M9 with 50mm Summicron at F2, 1/1000, ISO160

The gymnastics of street photography

While shooting in Paris, I estimate that I walk an average of 10 kilometers per day with peaks at 15kms. Quite a way to stay...
While shooting in Paris, I estimate that I walk an average of 10 kilometers per day with peaks at 15kms. Quite a way to stay fit, especially since stretching is also part of the game. Indeed, have a look at the shot below and imagine my position when taking the picture. The answer will be found in the second shot, courtesy of fellow street photographer Thomas C. which I had the pleasure to meet yesterday. At almost two meters all, I still had to raise on my toes to get the point of view I wanted. Why is it so...

Hire a street photographer for your wedding

About to get married and looking for a photographer ? Well, your task just got more difficult because I strongly recommend you to hire two...
About to get married and looking for a photographer ? Well, your task just got more difficult because I strongly recommend you to hire two of them. Indeed, you'll need a regular wedding photographer for all the cheesy stuff and the masterpiece that will throne for decades (hopefully) on the top of your living room's chimney. He will also make sure that nobody is forgotten, even 102 years old Aunt Annie, and rightly have a place in the 657 pages album proudly titled "The happiest day of our life". Yet if you want a real feel of how the wedding...

The French armlock

Look closely at the three picture below (couple in the back) for a demonstration of a greatly executed French armlock move. A technique especially effective...
Look closely at the three picture below (couple in the back) for a demonstration of a greatly executed French armlock move. A technique especially effective when used in Paris. Sometimes, a series grabs better the action of a scene. Obviously, in scenes with so much action going on, you are never aware of every single gesture happening in your frame. Though I had spotted the couple in the back and composed accordingly, it is only afterwards that I discovered their little game.  (click on pictures for high res) Leica M9 with 50mm Summicron